J.Elvin Dashiell Blog

J.Elvin Dashiell
Experienced, Caring, and Saving your Money
By Jen Steever 06 Sep, 2017
Last month, we addressed a question about the best Medicare Insurance options. We discussed what options folks who are employed by the military, state and local government, or private employers, should explore and plan for.

We will now tackle the options available to the majority of us who retire and go on Medicare. Unlike the folks we discussed last month, when you retire and no longer have commercial health insurance options, it is highly recommended that you get both Part A and Part B of Medicare. Part A has no continuing cost associated with it as it is paid for over the course of our entire working career through payroll deductions. Part B currently costs approximately $105 and is deducted from your Social Security or disability benefits every month.
By Jen Steever 17 Aug, 2017
That is very difficult to answer in the limited space of this blog, so we may continue it in others so that we get these answers just right by answering very carefully. First, not knowing your personal situation, we will explain the different options available for various individuals.
By Jen Steever 15 Aug, 2017

No one likes to think that their health could fail at any point, or that it will likely decline as you age. But it is important to keep these thoughts in mind, especially since the average 65-year-old American has a 70% chance of needing long-term care services in their lifetime.

When you take into consideration that the average medical expenses of a 65-year-old couple can total around $218,000 over 20 years, it's clear why so many people choose to invest in long-term care insurance. For the same reasons, Medicare supplement plans could be a huge money saver in the post-retirement years to come.

If you are wondering whether long-term care insurance is the right financial decision for you, then keep reading to learn more.


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By Jen Steever 06 Sep, 2017
Last month, we addressed a question about the best Medicare Insurance options. We discussed what options folks who are employed by the military, state and local government, or private employers, should explore and plan for.

We will now tackle the options available to the majority of us who retire and go on Medicare. Unlike the folks we discussed last month, when you retire and no longer have commercial health insurance options, it is highly recommended that you get both Part A and Part B of Medicare. Part A has no continuing cost associated with it as it is paid for over the course of our entire working career through payroll deductions. Part B currently costs approximately $105 and is deducted from your Social Security or disability benefits every month.
By Jen Steever 17 Aug, 2017
That is very difficult to answer in the limited space of this blog, so we may continue it in others so that we get these answers just right by answering very carefully. First, not knowing your personal situation, we will explain the different options available for various individuals.
By Jen Steever 15 Aug, 2017

No one likes to think that their health could fail at any point, or that it will likely decline as you age. But it is important to keep these thoughts in mind, especially since the average 65-year-old American has a 70% chance of needing long-term care services in their lifetime.

When you take into consideration that the average medical expenses of a 65-year-old couple can total around $218,000 over 20 years, it's clear why so many people choose to invest in long-term care insurance. For the same reasons, Medicare supplement plans could be a huge money saver in the post-retirement years to come.

If you are wondering whether long-term care insurance is the right financial decision for you, then keep reading to learn more.


By Jen Steever 27 Jul, 2017
The number of senior citizens is expected to grow from the current 40 million to 90 million in 2050. This will lead to an increased demand for healthcare services, housing, and -- more than likely -- financial planning services . To make matters even more complicated, a 2015 Gallup poll found that 37% of Americans won't retire until after the age of 65. Whether it's due to personal preference or because they simply cannot afford to retire until much later in life, seniors need to understand that the decision to keep working will impact their financial planning options. That's why it's so important for you to explore the types of financial services available to you now to help you prepare for this type of situation. But if you haven't yet seen a financial planner, you should be aware of how your delayed retirement can affect your financial options.
By Jen Steever 07 Jul, 2017
from J. Elvin Dashiell and the Senior Information Corner
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