Safe and No Risk Investments

  • By Jen Steever
  • 23 Jun, 2017

Investment Risk in Retirement by J. Elvin Dashiell

I have received so many questions over the years regarding the safety of certain investments so I would like to share with you about "safe" and "no risk" investments. I would like to define what those terms mean and how they apply to financial planning. Customers often believe investment choices are supposed to become more conservative and less risky as they approach retirement. They don't always know how to evaluate an investment's risk.

Understanding the Terminology

It's a good idea for everyone to be vigilant because these terms are misused quite often. They are not interchangeable. This would not be a concern except that the consequences of these terms can drastically affect your retirement nest egg . Let's define how these terms might be used by a financial advisor, broker, or investment advisor.

 

As a general rule, investment products offered by these people always carry the possibility of you losing a large portion of your retirement nest egg (i.e. stock market crashes in 2003 and 2008). It is often impossible for them to guarantee that you will never lose any of your money. So instead, they use the terms aggressive, moderate, or conservative to describe the levels of risk. When you get to retirement age, some will recommend you shift your investment to more moderate or conservative investments to mitigate the risk level but they cannot eliminate all risk.

Nest Egg Review

Our recommendation is that when you are at or near retirement, you owe it to yourself to have your retirement nest egg reviewed by a competent advisor who offers "no risk" investments. S2S Silver Services offers this service at no cost or obligation. It is critical for you to understand that the way your retirement nest egg was invested during your forty plus working years may not be how to proceed in retirement

 

"From the very first appointment, we knew we were in good hands with J. Elvin Dashiell. He listened to our concerns and answered our questions in great detail, but in a way we could understand. We never felt any pressure to act on his advice, and indeed were most impressed when he recommended not to change several of our investments. We trust and highly recommend Mr. Dashiell because of the integrity and honesty he displayed in all of our insurance and investment transactions." Margaret and Terry Fant, Virginia Beach

Contact S2S Silver Services today for your free investment review.
By Jen Steever 16 Oct, 2017


Nearly 45 million people are enrolled in Medicare due to their age, and around 90% of Medicare participants rely on supplemental plans to complete their coverage. But if you are healthy and not currently taking any prescription medications, do you really need Medicare Supplement plans in addition to your regular policy?

By Jen Steever 16 Oct, 2017
A traditional Medicare Supplement is the grandfather of insurance that backs up Medicare. Started in 1965, it is celebrating its 50th year of being the backup to Medicare parts A and B. If you have studied Medicare or insurance company information, you may have read terms like Medigap, Med Sup, or Gap insurance, which are named derivatives for the official designation of traditional Medicare Supplements. Whatever their name, they are all exactly the same thing.
By Jen Steever 27 Sep, 2017
For most seniors, having Medicare is vital. That being said, a basic Medicare plan may not be quite enough coverage for your needs. In fact, 90% of Medicare participants have some sort of supplemental health insurance, whether it be Medicaid, an employer-sponsored plan, Medicare Advantage, or Medicare Supplement plans (also known as Medigap). With so many Medicare supplement plan options to choose from, you may feel overwhelmed about having to choose one. Whether you made the wrong decision or your needs have simply changed, it's possible that your current supplemental policy isn't fitting the bill (or is making the bill much too high!). The good news is that it is possible to switch Medicare supplement plans. However, there's some important information you need to know first.
By Jen Steever 06 Sep, 2017
Last month, we addressed a question about the best Medicare Insurance options. We discussed what options folks who are employed by the military, state and local government, or private employers, should explore and plan for.

We will now tackle the options available to the majority of us who retire and go on Medicare. Unlike the folks we discussed last month, when you retire and no longer have commercial health insurance options, it is highly recommended that you get both Part A and Part B of Medicare. Part A has no continuing cost associated with it as it is paid for over the course of our entire working career through payroll deductions. Part B currently costs approximately $105 and is deducted from your Social Security or disability benefits every month.
By Jen Steever 17 Aug, 2017
That is very difficult to answer in the limited space of this blog, so we may continue it in others so that we get these answers just right by answering very carefully. First, not knowing your personal situation, we will explain the different options available for various individuals.
By Jen Steever 15 Aug, 2017

No one likes to think that their health could fail at any point, or that it will likely decline as you age. But it is important to keep these thoughts in mind, especially since the average 65-year-old American has a 70% chance of needing long-term care services in their lifetime.

When you take into consideration that the average medical expenses of a 65-year-old couple can total around $218,000 over 20 years, it's clear why so many people choose to invest in long-term care insurance. For the same reasons, Medicare supplement plans could be a huge money saver in the post-retirement years to come.

If you are wondering whether long-term care insurance is the right financial decision for you, then keep reading to learn more.


By Jen Steever 27 Jul, 2017
The number of senior citizens is expected to grow from the current 40 million to 90 million in 2050. This will lead to an increased demand for healthcare services, housing, and -- more than likely -- financial planning services . To make matters even more complicated, a 2015 Gallup poll found that 37% of Americans won't retire until after the age of 65. Whether it's due to personal preference or because they simply cannot afford to retire until much later in life, seniors need to understand that the decision to keep working will impact their financial planning options. That's why it's so important for you to explore the types of financial services available to you now to help you prepare for this type of situation. But if you haven't yet seen a financial planner, you should be aware of how your delayed retirement can affect your financial options.
By Jen Steever 07 Jul, 2017
from J. Elvin Dashiell and the Senior Information Corner
By Jen Steever 23 Jun, 2017

I have received so many questions over the years regarding the safety of certain investments so I would like to share with you about "safe" and "no risk" investments. I would like to define what those terms mean and how they apply to financial planning. Customers often believe investment choices are supposed to become more conservative and less risky as they approach retirement. They don't always know how to evaluate an investment's risk.

By Jen Steever 14 Jun, 2017
Approximately 45 million people are enrolled in Medicare due to their age, so if you're a senior over the age of 65, you're probably at least a little familiar with what these plans can offer. While original Medicare can provide coverage for vital services, these policies often don't cover every expense. That's why Medicare supplement policies are so popular: they can help bridge these gaps. But because there are so many Medicare supplement plan options to choose from, it's easy to become overwhelmed and confused. Below, we've explained these supplemental plans in a bit more detail.
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